Wind Power
What country uses wind energy the most?

What country uses wind energy the most?

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Introduction

Wind energy is a renewable resource and it’s becoming more common for countries around the world to embrace it on a growing scale. Hydroelectric dams have always been the most common form of renewable energy, but hydro and solar are quickly catching up thanks to technological advancements over the years. Today, more than 225 gigawatts worth of turbines suck up breezes across China and emit electricity instead of pollution into the air — an increase of 400-fold since 2005!

Wind energy is harnessed by wind turbines, which are then used to generate electricity or power. The wind is a renewable resource and using it to create energy causes no pollution nor environmental impact, leading countries around the world to embrace it on a growing scale.

Wind energy is harnessed by wind turbines, which are then used to generate electricity or power. The wind is a renewable resource and using it to create energy causes no pollution nor environmental impact, leading countries around the world to embrace it on a growing scale.

The United States uses more than 40% of global wind power installed capacity. China has been steadily increasing its wind generation capacity over the last decade and now ranks second in terms of installed capacity (12% share). Germany ranks fourth with 8% share of global wind power installed capacity.

According to data from 2019, Denmark had the largest share of renewable energy in the world at 42 percent. Hydroelectric and wind energy accounted for about two-thirds of that amount.

According to data from 2019, Denmark had the largest share of renewable energy in the world at 42 percent. Hydroelectric and wind energy accounted for about two-thirds of that amount. Denmark has been a leader in wind power since 1991 and currently leads all other countries by far, with more than 40% of their electricity generated by wind power alone.

Following Denmark was Iceland with 69 percent, Liberia with 62 percent and Costa Rica with 56 percent. All four countries generate much of their electricity through hydroelectric dams, but hydro and solar have always been the most common forms of renewable energy.

Hydroelectric dams are the most common form of renewable energy. In fact, they’re almost always the first thing that comes to mind when you think about renewables. Hydroelectricity accounts for around 15 percent of global electricity generation and 20 percent in Latin America alone.

Wind power is one of the fastest growing sources of clean energy—and it’s also one of the most popular: worldwide installed capacity has doubled since 2010, reaching 432 gigawatts (GW) at the end of 2017. Wind accounts for about 5 percent (or about half) of Denmark’s total electricity consumption; it also makes up around 3 percent in Germany and France, 2 percent in Spain and 0.1 percent or less across North America (although Canadian provinces such as Alberta have invested heavily in wind farms).

According to global think tank Enerdata, global installed capacity of wind power reached 661 gigawatts worldwide in 2018 — a 25-percent increase over 2017. This represents a nearly 100-fold increase since 1990, when global wind capacity was at 8 gigawatts.

Wind power is a clean, renewable, and plentiful energy source. When you think of wind turbines, you probably picture enormous structures towering over the landscape. But there’s a lot more to it than that!

Wind power can be generated in a variety of ways: through large wind farms with hundreds or even thousands of individual turbines; urban rooftops; or small residential units like those shown here at an elementary school in New Hampshire (pictured).

The benefits are obvious: It’s non-emitting and doesn’t produce global warming gases like carbon dioxide (CO2). Plus, it’s free—and if you live where windy conditions abound (like the Great Plains states), then you don’t need backup batteries or other energy storage devices since the winds will keep your home running smoothly even when there’s no sun out!

China’s wind power generation has grown more than 400-fold since 2005, when it was at just 1 gigawatt. Today, more than 225 gigawatts of wind power has been installed in China. Second place goes to the United States, where 115 gigawatts worth of turbines suck up the breezes across the country and emit electricity instead of pollution into the air.

  • China’s wind power generation has grown more than 400-fold since 2005, when it was at just 1 gigawatt. Today, more than 225 gigawatts of wind power has been installed in China. Second place goes to the United States, where 115 gigawatts worth of turbines suck up the breezes across the country and emit electricity instead of pollution into the air.
  • Since 2010, South Korea’s capacity has increased from 2 GW to 11 GW in 2018—a ninefold increase over a period of only 8 years!

Conclusion

Wind power is a renewable source of energy that has grown significantly in recent years. The world’s top five countries are Denmark, Iceland, Liberia, Costa Rica and China. These countries have harnessed wind energy through wind turbines and now produce more than half their electricity from this natural resource.

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