Biomass
Does biomass cause pollution?

Does biomass cause pollution?

Views: 54
0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 47 Second

Introduction

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently published a report that concludes that biomass energy production is carbon neutral, i.e., it does not cause net additions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Biomass is organic material — like algae, grass or wood — that can be used as a fuel source to make electricity and other forms of power. Scientists have long concluded that burning biomass is carbon neutral because plants absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) as they grow, and release most of it when they’re burned; in essence, they’re just returning the CO2 to the air instead of releasing more CO2 that was stored underground in coal seams or crude oil deposits.”

A new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concludes that biomass energy production is carbon neutral, i.e., it does not cause net additions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

A new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concludes that biomass energy production is carbon neutral, i.e., it does not cause net additions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

The EPA’s report was prepared by the National Center for Biomass-to-Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and reviewed by several independent scientists, including two Nobel Prize winners in chemistry. The resulting document presents a strong case for the environmental friendliness of bioenergy; however, this assessment is controversial among some circles who see biomass as a “carbon bomb” or other similar negative image (see Related Links below).

Biomass is organic material — like algae, grass or wood — that can be used as a fuel source to make electricity and other forms of power.

Biomass is organic material — like algae, grass or wood — that can be used as a fuel source to make electricity and other forms of power. Biomass is carbon neutral because it absorbs as much carbon dioxide from the air as it releases when burned or processed.

Scientists have long concluded that burning biomass is carbon neutral because plants absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) as they grow, and release most of it when they’re burned; in essence, they’re just returning the CO2 to the air instead of releasing more CO2 that was stored underground in coal seams or crude oil deposits.

Biomass energy is a renewable alternative to fossil fuels that has been shown to be carbon-neutral. That means it doesn’t add more CO2 to our atmosphere, because the plants that produce biomass absorb CO2 while they grow. When those plants are burned for fuel, they release most of the carbon dioxide they’ve absorbed—so in essence, burning biomass just returns CO2 to the air instead of adding additional emissions into our atmosphere.

As you can see, biomass doesn’t cause pollution; in fact, it actually helps reduce it!

But opponents have argued that trees take a long time to grow and that biomass energy will encourage cutting down forests.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, biomass is “the organic materials of living or recently living organisms, including both plants and animals.”

The main argument against using biomass energy is that trees take a long time to grow, and that biomass energy could encourage cutting down forests. But there are other arguments too: Some people say burning trees releases pollution into the air because it produces carbon dioxide (CO2), which contributes to climate change.

But opponents have argued that trees take a long time to grow and that biomass energy will encourage cutting down forests. But what does science say? Biomass isn’t just about burning wood—it’s also about using things like corn stalks as fuel for electricity generation or producing biofuel from algae or microalgae in ponds on farms instead of food crops like rice straws, which would normally be used as animal feed (see Figure 1). In fact, even though deforestation accounts for 20% of all global greenhouse gas emissions according to an estimate by World Bank economists Frank Rijsberman et al., they found that reducing deforestation could only achieve one quarter of what needs doing if we’re going reduce warming below 2°C above preindustrial levels by 2100.”

Biomass energy is carbon neutral and does not cause pollution

Biomass energy is renewable and carbon neutral, meaning it does not cause pollution. Biomass has been used as a source of fuel for centuries, with examples ranging from firewood to the burning of crops such as corn stalks and sugar cane in Brazil.

Biomass is carbon neutral because when plants grow they absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which means that when you use biomass fuels – like wood or pellets – you are removing that same amount of CO2 from the atmosphere. This means that if you burn one tonne of wood today you are preventing two tonnes of CO2 from being released into our atmosphere over the next 100 years (1:2 ratio).

There are some concerns around using biomass in power stations however; this is because these large scale facilities often require large amounts of land space to grow sufficient crops or trees for fuel production.

Conclusion

Biomass energy is carbon neutral and does not cause pollution. Scientists have long concluded that burning biomass is carbon neutral because plants absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) as they grow, and release most of it when they’re burned; in essence, they’re just returning the CO2 to the air instead of releasing more CO2 that was stored underground in coal seams or crude oil deposits. But opponents have argued that trees take a long time to grow and that biomass energy will encourage cutting down forests. A new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concludes that biomass energy production is carbon neutral, i.e., it does not cause net additions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.”

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *